Retirement Security

Issue Summary News Policy Report Coalition of Supporters – Social Security Coalition of Supporters – NM Work & Save Take Action On Social Security Tax Repeal Take Action On the New Mexico Work & Save Act Take Action On Upgrading the PERA Board

2020 Legislative Update

During the 2020 legislative session, bills were introduced on all three of Think New Mexico’s recommendations for improving retirement security in New Mexico.

The New Mexico Work and Save Act (House Bill 44, sponsored by Rep. Tomas Salazar, Rep. Gail Armstrong, Rep. Christine Chandler, Sen. Bill Tallman & Sen. Michael Padilla) would create a system of Individual Retirement Accounts, similar to the state’s 529 college savings accounts, that would be available to workers who do not have access to retirement savings plans through their jobs. The research shows that people are 15 times more likely to save for retirement if they can do so using automatic deductions from their paychecks. Unfortunately, New Mexico currently leads the nation in the percentage of workers who lack access to work-based retirement savings plans that they can contribute to using automatic payroll deductions. House Bill 44 passed the House on a vote of 62-1, the Senate on a vote of 40-0, and is now on the governor’s desk awaiting her signature!

Repealing or reducing the state’s income tax on Social Security benefits. New Mexico is one of only 13 states that tax Social Security income, and it is a form of double taxation since New Mexicans pay income taxes on the money they put into Social Security and then they are taxed again on the benefits they receive. No other government benefits (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, TANF, food stamps) are taxed.

Six bills were introduced to repeal or reduce the state’s tax on Social Security benefits: House Bill 29 (Reps. Cathrynn Brown, Gail Armstrong, Rebecca Dow, Jack Chatfield, & Randal Crowder), House Bill 130 (Rep. Gail Armstrong, Rep. Rebecca Dow, Sen. Candace Gould & Sen. Jim White), and Senate Bill 81 (Sens. Jim White, Michael Padilla, Candace Gould, & Liz Stefanics) would repeal the state’s tax on Social Security entirely, while House Bill 77 (Rep. Daymon Ely, Rep. Gail Armstrong, & Sen. Bill Tallman) would exempt the first $24,000 in Social Security income from tax, Senate Bill 68 (Sens. Michael Padilla & Jim White) would exempt the first $25,000, and Senate Bill 170 (Sen. Pete Campos) would exempt the first $30,000.

House Bills 29 and 77 passed their first House committee unanimously, but were tabled (killed) in their second. The Senate bills never even came up for a hearing. Although we are disappointed by this outcome, we are not deterred. We were inspired by the massive public support for this reform – over 9,600 emails were sent to legislators and the governor on this issue during the 30-day session! – and we will continue our fight to repeal it in next year’s legislative session.

Increasing qualifications to for PERA pension board members (Senate Bill 201, Sen. George Munoz). Currently, no member of the PERA board, which oversees $15.8 billion for 90,000 public workers and retirees, is required to have any background in finance or investment management. The PERA board is completely dysfunctional, as was recently reported in the Santa Fe New Mexican, and research shows that poor governance can cost pensions 1-2% annually. Just a 1% reduction means the dysfunction on the current PERA board could cost the fund nearly $160 million dollars a year. SB 201 would restructure the PERA board in several ways, including adding qualifications for board members.

Unfortunately, Senate Bill 201 never received a hearing during this year’s short session. We will continue working with the key stakeholders in this effort over the coming months and we’ll be working to enact these reforms during next year’s legislative session.

Issue Summary

New Mexico is facing a looming retirement security crisis. Our state already ranks third highest in the nation for the percentage of seniors living in poverty (12.2%), according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This percentage will likely grow in the coming years, as two out of three private sector workers in the state have no money saved for retirement, and 80% have less than $10,000 saved. Meanwhile, the state’s public pensions are underfunded by a total of $12.5 billion, putting their long-term solvency in jeopardy.

In response to this crisis, in 2019, Think New Mexico launched a new initiative designed to enhance retirement security for all New Mexicans. This initiative proposed three major reforms that will put money back in the pockets of today’s retirees and ensure that more seniors in the future will have adequate savings to enjoy their retirement.

First, we are recommending that policymakers repeal the state’s income tax on Social Security benefits. New Mexico is one of only 13 states that taxes Social Security benefits. In the past decade, eight of those 13 states have significantly reduced their taxes, and New Mexico now has the second heaviest tax on Social Security benefits in the nation. The Social Security tax is a form of double taxation, since New Mexicans pay income tax on the money that is deducted from their paychecks for Social Security, and then they are taxed again on the benefits they receive. Today the state’s tax on Social Security benefits costs the average Social Security recipient nearly $700 per year.

Second, we are supporting an innovative reform that would ensure that every private sector worker in New Mexico has access to a retirement account that they can contribute to using automatic payroll deductions. The research shows that workers are 15 times more likely to save for retirement if they can contribute to a retirement plan using automatic payroll deductions. Yet two out of every three private sector workers – 336,000 New Mexicans – lack access to a retirement savings plan through their jobs.

The New Mexico Saves Act, which is similar to reforms adopted by a growing number of states, would create a system of Individual Retirement Accounts funded by automatic payroll deductions that would be offered to workers whose employers do not already provide a retirement savings plan. These payroll deduction IRAs would be similar to 529 college savings plans, and would give small businesses a simple and inexpensive way to help their workers begin saving for retirement. (The New Mexico Saves Act is supported by State Treasurer Tim Eichenberg and AARP New Mexico, among others, as well as Think New Mexico.)

Finally, we recommend three reforms to improve the stability and performance of New Mexico’s public pension funds. These recommendations include using some of the state’s record budget surplus to make a one-time, $700 million cash infusion or bridge loan to the Public Employees Retirement Association (PERA); consolidating the investment management of PERA and Education Retirement Board (ERB) pension funds to achieve higher returns and lower fees; and (3) professionalizing the pension oversight boards by increasing the qualifications of those who serve on them (currently, no member of the PERA board, which oversees $15.7 billion, is required to have any experience or expertise in financial or investment management). All of these proposals are complementary with the reforms that have been recently recommended by Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham’s 2019 PERA Solvency Task Force.

Think New Mexico will be advocating for these reforms during the 2020 legislative session. Sign up for our email alerts and follow our Facebook and Twitter pages to stay informed and get involved on this issue!

News Coverage

radioicon-smallListen to KUNM 89.9 FM radio story on the passage of the New Mexico Work & Save Act • February 19, 2020 (mp3, 1:32)

newspapericon-smallRead an Albuquerque Journal editorial in support of the New Mexico Work and Save Act to expand access to retirement savings for private sector workers in New Mexico • February 13, 2020

newspapericon-smallRead articles in the Albuquerque Journal and Santa Fe New Mexican about how the effort to repeal the tax on Social Security is gaining momentum • January 29, 2020

radioicon-smallListen to KSFR 101.1 FM radio story on Think New Mexico’s legislation to improve retirement security in New Mexico • February 5, 2020 (mp3, 18:42)

newspapericon-smallRead an opinion editorial by Fred Nathan and Kristina Fisher about the New Mexico Work and Save Act to expand access to retirement savings for private sector workers in New Mexico • January 26, 2020

tvicon-smallWatch a KRWG-TV story about Dona Ana County urging the legislature and governor to repeal the tax on Social Security • December 12, 2019 (5:25)

newspapericon-smallRead an opinion editorial from retired state employees about the need to professionalize New Mexico’s PERA pension oversight board • January 3, 2020

newspapericon-smallRead an article about the dysfunction on New Mexico’s PERA pension oversight board • December 13, 2019

tvicon-smallWatch a KRQE News 13 story about legislation to increase qualifications for members of New Mexico’s PERA pension oversight board • December 21, 2019 (1:51)

newspapericon-smallRead Think New Mexico’s opinion editorial about the need to repeal New Mexico’s tax on Social Security benefits • November 22, 2019

newspapericon-smallRead a column by syndicated columnist Sherry Robinson about Think New Mexico’s retirement security initiative • December 11, 2019

newspapericon-smallRead a column by Walt Rubel about Think New Mexico’s retirement security initiative • November 20, 2019

newspapericon-smallRead an editorial from the Guadalupe County Communicator about Think New Mexico’s retirement security initiative • October 31, 2019

newspapericon-smallRead an editorial from the Albuquerque Journal in support of Think New Mexico’s retirement security initiative • October 13, 2019

newspapericon-smallRead an article in the Taos News about Think New Mexico’s retirement security initiative • October 21, 2019

newspapericon-smallRead an article in the Albuquerque Journal about Think New Mexico’s retirement security initiative • October 6, 2019

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